Don’t Give Winter The Colder Shoulder: Act Now

Winter is both a wonderful and terrible time of the year. As a result, it’s easier to discuss the negative impacts of the winter time once we’re away from it! While you might be thinking of the snow painting white landscapes and the snowmen appearing gradually in each front garden, there is also another side to winter. Winter is a cold season that endangers the safety of your home, the survival of the wildlife, and – even worse – human survival too. It would be unfair and irresponsible to only think of hot chocolate, a battle of snowballs and Christmas decoration when too many lives are fighting to go through winter. As a result, it is now time to consider what you can do to prepare for the colder months and to improve your home, the wildlife’s chances and the life of the many people who don’t have a roof over their heads.

Homeless and cold

What Are You Doing At Home?

The problem with winter is that it is a season of high natural risks that can damage your home, or simply infiltrate through a weak structure. For instance, water is not only about snow. Rain too can join the party and cause serious damages to your home, especially if your roof is holey. Unfortunately, a holey roof is noticed only when the first winter rain creates a drip inside the home. In other words, it’s best to get your roof checked in advance! Additionally, if you live in a region that is renowned for its cold winter, you might want to ensure that your pipes don’t freeze. This could destroy your water system, and cause your home to be cut off from the water supply until the repairs can be done. So if you are looking for ways to avoid such issues, Heat-Line is a good name to bear in mind. It is a Canadian company that has developed freeze-protection solutions to withstand the coldest climates. It’s not the kind of expertise you want to live without if your home is in a cold region.

What Are You Doing For The Wildlife?

Even the wildlife has a hard time in winter. Therefore it is important to give it the best help you can. This starts by letting your garden go wild so that animals can hide and hibernate safely. Additionally, if you have a water feature, remember to break the ice so that the fish or frogs that hibernate at the bottom can survive. Additionally, make sure to leave food for the animals. Birds, especially find it difficult to feed themselves in winter, so providing a range of peanuts, seeds, and table scraps will prove very useful. If you have a big garden, feel free to leave food for other visitors, such as bread and boiled potatoes for foxes, nuts for squirrels and even cheese for badgers.

Rodent Animal Garden Squirrel Winter Parus Major

Squirrel in winter

What Are You Doing For Others?

Helping others

Members from the Charleston Elks Lodge 242 pass out hygiene products to homeless veterans and civilians at the 11th annual Stand Down Against Homelessness Oct. 29, 2010, at North Charleston Armory Park, S.C. The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks is an American fraternal order and social club founded in 1868. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Timothy Taylor)

There are hundreds of thousands homeless people in every country. Too many die during the winter; they freeze to death. It is a horrible way to go. While you can’t find them a home, you can certainly help them to survive dire winter months. You could choose to distribute food, toiletry supplies, and warmer clothes to help those who sleep outdoors to survive. Often warm socks, sleeping bags, and blankets can make a huge difference when the weather is cold. So what can you give to save another life next winter?

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