3 Musical Instruments Ideal for Learning to Play On

Learning a new musical instrument requires time, patience, and lots of practise. This process can be made easier by first choosing an instrument that is easy to learn on. This article will consider 3 musical instruments that fit the criteria of being ideal musical instruments for beginners. Then, when you have become reasonably proficient at playing one of them, you might consider taking up a second instrument, or even learning more about musical production. Many people, for instance, start with the piano for a good grounding in music and then progress to either a woodwind or stringed instrument. Or, they go to a site where they can get dj finance and dip into the world of electronic music creation, using their skills learned as a foundation. It can, of course, happen the other way around, when someone is highly proficient at playing say a clarinet and then turns to a piano to expand their knowledge of harmonies and composition to help with entering music college.

Piano

The piano is a good instrument to learn music on because it can be played at different levels but can still produce music that is pleasant to listen to. Each note will instantly produce a sound from a low register to a higher one.

It is a myth that you need long fingers to play a piano. Elton John will admit himself that he has short stubby fingers yet has achieved great success by singing whilst being accompanied by his own piano playing. It is true that he might have followed a more classical path had his fingers been longer, but they certainly have not held him back. Russ Conway, from a slightly earlier period in music, lost the tip of his third finger in a bread slicer but still managed to play the most wonderful piano and achieve success with hits such as ‘Side Saddle’, ‘Snow Coach’, ‘Royal Event’, and ‘Toy Balloons’.

The key to good piano playing, excusing the pun, is to adopt good habits from the start. That is, in learning the correct posture and the positions that the hands should be in. It is far easier to play piano when incorporating correct finger positioning with hand movements.

Ukulele

The hardest part of learning to play a ukulele is spelling it. In comparison to the guitar or mandolin, it is an easier instrument to learn. This is because, for a child for example, its soft nylon strings prove gentler to the fingertips. This explains why many guitarists will use a plectrum to strum and play the

strings. In addition, the smaller size of the ukulele reduces the tension the wrists feels because the notes are more easily reachable without the need for stretching, like on a guitar. Another benefit of a ukulele, to mention it again and help me to spell it, is that it is not as weighty as some other stringed instruments, so more manageable when holding it standing up. Straps are useful, too.

Recorder

Another musical instrument that is one of the easier ones to play and learn on is the recorder, although the ukulele does seem to have overtaken it in popularity more recently in schools. Traditionally, the recorder has been a popular instrument in schools because it is cheap, light to hold, and not easy to break. In musical situations, they allow for ensemble and choir music to be played without anyone having to teach a new instrument. It is straightforward to pick-up and play after learning a few hole positions.

Recorders are an easy musical instrument to play because they do not require a specialized embouchure like other wind instruments. That is, the shape that the mouth is held in. To suit a variety of players, recorders come in varying sizes.

So, 3 musical instruments to think about. From the piano we might feel that we should begin on, if we have the opportunity, to the ukulele that I can now spell, or the recorder that is the most portable out of them all. A recorder can just slip into a bag and be transported back and forth from the music department. With permission, of course. Or a parent might buy the instrument to save that being necessary and allow for it to be practised more often still.

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